Other publications

Books

  • Anita Chan, Richard Madsen and Jonathan Unger, Chen Village: Revolution to Globalization (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2009), viii + 408 pages.
  • Andrew Kipnis, Luigi Tomba and Jonathan Unger (eds.), Contemporary Chinese Society and Politics, 4 Volumes (London: Routledge, 2009), 1,888 pages.
  • Jonathan Unger (ed.), Associations and the Chinese State: Contested Spaces (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2008), ix +275 pages.
  • Jonathan Unger, The Transformation of Rural China (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2002), xviii + 265 pages.
  • Jonathan Unger (ed.), The Nature of Chinese Politics (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2002), xvi +333 pages.
  • Anita Chan, Benedict Kerkvliet, and Jonathan Unger (eds), Transforming Asian Socialism: China and Vietnam Compared (Sydney: Allen and Unwin; Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield, 1999), viii + 240 pages.
  • Jonathan Unger (ed.), Chinese Nationalism (Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1996), xviii + 236 pages.
  • Barrett McCormick and Jonathan Unger (eds), China After Socialism: In the Footsteps of Eastern Europe or East Asia? (Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1996), viii + 224 pages.
  • Jonathan Unger (ed.), ‘Using the Past to Serve the Present’: Historiography and Politics in Contemporary China (Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, 1993), xii + 292 pages.
  • Anita Chan, Richard Madsen, and Jonathan Unger, Chen Village Under Mao and Deng (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1992), viii + 345 pages. This is a considerably updated and expanded edition of the Chen Village book. It also is published in a Chinese-language edition (Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 1996), x + 302 pages. See more details about this book, including the first 18 pages of Chapter 1.
  • Jonathan Unger (ed.), The Pro-Democracy Protests in China: Reports from the Provinces (Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, and Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 1991), xv + 239 pages.
  • Anita Chan, Richard Madsen, and Jonathan Unger, Chen Village: The Recent History of a Peasant Community in Mao’s China (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1984; paperback edition, 1985), viii + 293 pages; Japanese-language edition, 1989, xii + 356 pages.
  • Anita Chan, Stanley Rosen, and Jonathan Unger (eds), On Socialist Democracy and the Chinese Legal System: The Li Yizhe Debates (White Plains, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, 1985), viii + 311 pages.
  • Jonathan Unger, Education Under Mao: Class and Competition in Canton Schools, 1960-1980 (New York: Columbia University Press, 1982; paperback edition, 1983), xii + 308 pages.
  • Jonathan Unger (ed.), Chinese Rural Institutions & the Question of Transferability (Oxford: Pergamon Press, 1980), 164 pages.
  • Jonathan Unger, The Politics of Wages in the Socialist States: An Inquiry into the Origins of Inequalities (Brighton, England: Institute of Development Studies, 1975), 182 pages.
  • Jonathan Grant, Laurence Moss, and Jonathan Unger (eds), Cambodia: The Widening War in Indochina (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1971), x + 355 pages.

Journal papers and Book chapters

  • Jonathan Unger and Anita Chan, “State Corporatism and Business Associations in China: A Comparison with Earlier Emerging Economies of East Asia”, International Journal of Emerging Markets, Vol. 10, No. 2 (April 2015), pp. 178-193.
  • Kong Tao, Jonathan Unger, and Liu Pengling, “Empirical Research into the Distribution of Contracted Village Land” (in Chinese), Nongye Jingji Wenti (Rural Economic Issues), No. 11, issue no. 419 (November 2014), pp. 87-98.
  • Jonathan Unger, Anita Chan and Him Chong, Deliberative Democracy at China’s Grass Roots: Case Studies of a Hidden Phenomenon, Politics and Society, Vol. 42, No. 4 (December 2014), pp. 513-535.
  • The Third Plenum and Rural Property Rights: Significant Decisions in the Right Direction, in Peter Harris, ed., China at the Crossroads: What the Third Plenum Means for China, New Zealand and the World (Wellington, NZ: Victoria University Press, 2014, pp. 57-63.
  • Zhongguo nongcun de jiating fengsu he tudi zai fenpei (Familial Customs in Chinese Villages and Redistributions of Land), in Kuan Hsinchi and Jean Hung, eds., Zhong Wai Ming Xuezhe Lun 21 Shiji Chu de Zhongguo [Illustrious Chinese and Foreign Scholars’ Perspectives on China in the Early 21st Century] (Hong Kong: The Chinese University Press, 2009), pp. 699-710.
  • Sherry Tao Kong and Jonathan Unger, “Egalitarian Redistributions of Agricultural Land in China through Community Consensus: Findings from Two Surveys”, The China Journal, No. 69 (January 2013), pp. 1-25. [PDF file (597KB)]
  • Him Chung and Jonathan Unger, “The Guangdong Model of Urbanisation: Collective Village Land and the Making of a New Middle Class”, China Perspectives, No. 2013/3 (September 2013), pp. 33-42. [PDF file (659KB)]
  • Simultaneously published in French as:  Him Chung et Jonathan Unger, “Le Modele d’urbanisation du Guangdong: terres collectives et emergence d’une nouvelle class moyenne dans les villages”, Perspectives Chinoises, No 3, Septembre 2013, 35-44. [PDF file (602KB)]
  • Jonathan Unger, “Die Veranderung der Lebens- und Arbeitsbegingungen chinesischer WanderarbeiterInnen und ihre Auswirkungen auf Arbeitskonflikte” (_The Evolving Conditions of Chinese Migrant Factory Workers and the Effects on Labour Disputes: An Introduction), in _Georg Egger, Daniel Fuchs, Thomas Immervill, and Lydia Steinmassl (eds.), Arbeitskampfe In China (Labour Conflicts in China), Vienna: Promedia Druck- Verlagsgesellschaft, 2013), pp. 23-34. [PDF file (552KB)]
  • Jonathan Unger,  “Status Groups and Classes in a Chinese Village: From the Mao Era through Post-Mao Industrialization”, in Beatriz Carrillo and David S. G. Goodman (eds.), China’s Peasants and Workers: Changing Class Identities (London: Edward Elgar, 2012), pp. 15-39.
  • Beibei Tang and Jonathan Unger, “The Socioeconomic Status, Co-optation and Political Conservatism of the Educated Middle Class: A Case Study of University Teachers “, in Minghong Chen and David S.G. Goodman (eds), Middle-class China (London:Edward Elgar Publishing, 2013), pp. 90-109.
  • Continuity and Change in Rural China’s Organization”, in Ane Bislev and Stig Thorgesen (eds.), Organizing Rural China—Rural China Organizing (Maryland: Lexington Books, 2012), pp 15-34.
  • Jonathan Unger, Diana Beaumont, and Anita Chan, “Did Unionization Make a Difference? Work Conditions and Trade Union Activity at Chinese Walmart Stores”, in Anita Chan, ed., Walmart in China (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2011), pp. 217-238.
  • The Cultural Revolution Warfare at Beijing’s Universities”, The China Journal, No. 64 (July 2010), pp. 199-211.
  • “Families and Farmland in Chinese Villages: Unexpected Findings”, in Mary Farquhar (ed.), Twenty-first Century China: Views from the South (Cambridge: Cambridge Scholarly Publications, 2009), pp. 138-155.
  • Poverty in the Hinterlands: The Conundrums of Underdevelopment”, in Andrew Kipnis, Luigi Tomba, and Jonathan Unger (eds.), Contemporary Chinese Society and Politics, Vol. 4 (London: Routledge, 2009), pp. 143-167.
  • “The Social Conflicts Underpinning China’s Cultural Revolution Turmoil”, Agora, Vol. 44, No. 2 (July 2009), pp. 4-10.
  • ‘Anita Chan and Jonathan Unger, A Chinese State Enterprise Under The Reforms:What Model Of Capitalism?’, The China Journal, No. 62, pp. 1-26.
  • Chinese Associations, Civil Society, and State Corporatism: Disputed Terrain”, in Jonathan Unger (ed.), Associations and the Chinese>State: Contested Spaces (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2008), pp. 1-13.
  • Jonathan Unger and Anita Chan, “Associations in a Bind: The Emergence of Political Corporatism”, in Jonathan Unger (ed.), Associations and the Chinese State: Contested Spaces (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2008), pp. 48-68.
  • The Strange Marriage between the State and Private Business in Beijing”, in Jonathan Unger (ed.), Associations and the Chinese State: Contested Spaces (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2008), pp. 117-48
  • Rediscovering Chinese Society in the Socialist Era: Using the Past to Serve the Present”, Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, Vol. 3 (April 2008), pp. 223-43.
  • Jonathan Unger and Anita Chan, “Memories and the Moral Economy of a State-Owned Enterprise”, in Ching Kwan Lee and Guobin Yang (eds.), Re-envisioning the Chinese Revolution: The Politics and Poetics of Collective Memories in Reform China (Washington, D.C.: Woodrow Wilson Center Press, and Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2007), pp. 119-140.
  • “The Cultural Revolution at the Grass Roots”, The China Journal, No. 57 (January 2007), pp. 109-137.[PDF file (138KB)]
  • “Family Customs and Farmland Reallocations in Contemporary Chinese Villages”, in Social Transformations in Chinese Societies, Vol. 1, No. 1 (March 2006), pp. 113-130 [PDF file (90KB)]
  • “China’s Conservative Middle Class”, Far Eastern Economic Review, April 2006, pp. 27-31. [PDF file (25KB)]
  • Jonathan Unger and Anita Chan, “The Internal Politics of an Urban Chinese Work Community: A Case Study of Employee Influence on Decision-Making at a State-Owned Factory.” The China Journal, No. 52 (July 2004), pp. 1-24. [PDF File (193 KB)]
  • “Irrigation and Poverty in China”, Development Bulletin, No. 61 (May 2003), pp. 43-46.
  • “Entrenching Poverty: The Drawbacks of the Chinese Government’s Policies and Programs”, Development Bulletin, No. 61 (May 2003), pp. 29-33. [PDF file (91KB)]
  • Anita Chan and Jonathan Unger, “The China Journal and the Changing State of China Studies”, Issues & Studies, Vol. 38, No. 4 (March 2003), pp. 327-331.
  • “Poverty, credit and microcredit in rural China”, Development Bulletin, 57, February 2002, pp. 23-26. [PDF file (29Kb)]
  • Power, Patronage and Protest in Rural China”, in Tyrene White (ed.), China Briefing 2000: The Continuing Transformation (Armonk: M.E. Sharpe, 2000), pp. 71-94.
  • Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet, Anita Chan and Jonathan Unger, “Comparing China and Vietnam”, in Anita Chan, Benedict Kerkvliet, and Jonathan Unger (eds), Transforming Asian Socialism: China and Vietnam Compared (Sydney: Allen and Unwin; Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield, 1999), pp.1-14.
  • “The Poor and the New Rich in the Chinese Countryside”, Den Ny Verden (Denmark) [Scandinavia’s leading development studies journal], Vol. 32, No. 2 (August 1999), pp. 128-44.
  • Jonathan Unger and Anita Chan, “Inheritors of the Boom: Private Enterprise and the Role of Local Government in a Rural South China Township”, The China Journal, No. 42 (July 1999), pp. 45-74.[PDF file (155KB)]
  • Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet, Anita Chan and Jonathan Unger, “Comparing China and Vietnam”, in Anita Chan, Benedict Kerkvliet, and Jonathan Unger (eds), Transforming Asian Socialism: China and Vietnam Compared (Sydney: Allen and Unwin; Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield, 1999), pp.1-14.
  • Hy Van Luong and Jonathan Unger, “Wealth and Poverty in the Transition to Market Economies: The Process of Socio-Economic Differentiation in Rural China and Northern Vietnam”, The China Journal, No. 40 (July 1998), pp. 61-93; also in Anita Chan, Benedict Kerkvliet and Jonathan Unger (eds), Transforming Asian Socialism: China and Vietnam Compared (Sydney: Allen and Unwin; Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield, 1999), pp. 120-52.[PDF file (172KB)]
  • “Cultural Revolution Conflict in the Villages”, The China Quarterly, No. 153 (March 1998), pp. 82-106. [Research Note PDF 137 KB]
  • “Not Quite Han: The Ethnic Minorities of China’s Southwest”, Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, Vol. 29, No. 3 (December 1997), pp. 67-78. [PDF file (117KB)]
  • “Introduction” to Yang Xiaokai, Captive Spirits: Prisoners of the Cultural Revolution (Hong Kong: Oxford University Press, 1997), pp. 6-18.
  • “ ‘Bridges’: Private Business, the Chinese Government and the Rise of New Associations”, The China Quarterly, No. 147 (September 1996), pp. 796-819. [PDF file (3MB)]
  • Jonathan Unger and Anita Chan, “China, Corporatism, and the East Asian Model”, The Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs, No. 33 (January 1995), pp. 29-53; reprinted in Chun Lin (ed.), China: The International Library of Politics and Comparative Government, Vol. III (Aldershot: Ashgate Press, 1999). A considerably longer version of this paper appears in Barrett McCormick and Jonathan Unger (eds), China After Socialism: In the Footsteps of Eastern Europe or East Asia?(Armonk, N.Y.: M. E. Sharpe, 1996), pp. 95-129. An up-dated version, in Chinese, appears in Zhanlue yu Guanli, No. 44 (January 2001). [PDF file (2.93MB)]
  • “Recent Trends in Modern China Studies in the English-language World”, Asian Research Trends, No. 4 (July 1994), pp. 179-186.
  • “ ‘Rich Man, Poor Man’: The Making of New Classes in the Chinese Countryside”, in David Goodman and Beverley Hooper (eds), China’s Quiet Revolution: New Interactions between State and Society (Melbourne: Longman Cheshire; New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1994), pp. 43-63. [ANU Only - PDF file]
  • “Urban Chinese Families in the Eighties: An Analysis of Chinese Surveys”, in Deborah Davis and Stevan Harrell (eds), Chinese Families in the Post-Mao Era (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1993), pp. 25-49. [ANU Only - PDF file]
  • “Whither China?: Yang Xiguang, Red Capitalists, and the Social Turmoil of the Cultural Revolution”, Modern China, Vol. 17, No. 1 (January 1991), pp. 3-37. [PDF file (124KB)]
  • “Internal Change in China: Commentary”, in Stuart Harris and James Cotton (eds), The End of the Cold War in Northeast Asia (Melbourne: Longman Cheshire; and Boulder, Colorado: Lynne Rienner, 1991), pp. 72-78.
  • Anita Chan and Jonathan Unger, “Voices from the Protest Movement in Chongqing, Sichuan”, The Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs, No. 24 (July 1990), pp. 259-279. Also as “Voices from the Protest Movement in Chongqing: Class Accents and Class Tensions”, in Jonathan Unger (ed.), The Pro-Democracy Protests in China__: Reports from the Provinces (Armonk, New York: M.E. Sharpe, and Sydney: Allen & Unwin, 1991), pp. 106-126. [PDF file (2.45MB)]
  • Jonathan Unger and Jean Xiong, “Life in the Chinese Hinterlands Under the Economic Reforms”, Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, Vol. 22, No. 2 (April 1990), pp. 4-17. [PDF file (100KB)]
  • “State and Peasant in Post-Revolution China”, The Journal of Peasant Studies, Vol. 17, No. 1 (October 1989), pp. 114-136.
  • “Between Mao and Manna” (with Pok-chi Lau), Bulletin of Concerned Asian Scholars, Vol. 21, No. 1 (January 1989), pp. 24-32.
  • “China’s New Political Structure”, in Gary Klintworth (ed.), China’s Crisis: The International Implications, Canberra Paper 57, Strategic and Defence Studies Centre, Research School of Pacific Studies, ANU, 1989, pp. 4-11.
  • “Local Power and Economic Reform: The Chinese Leadership’s Present Dilemma”, China Information, Vol. 2, No. 2 (Autumn 1987), pp. 1-15.
  • “The Hong Kong Connection: China Research from the Room Next Door”, C_hina_ Information, Vol. 2, No. 1 (Summer 1987), pp. 27-36.
  • “The Struggle to Dictate China’s Administration: The Conflict of Branches vs Areas vs Reform”, The Australian Journal of Chinese Affairs, Issue 18 (July 1987), pp. 15-45. [PDF file (3.64MB)]
  • “Remuneration, Ideology and Personal Interests in a Chinese Village, 1960-1980”, International Journal of Sociology, Vol. 14, No. 4 (Winter 1984-85), pp. 3-27; also in William Parish (ed.), Chinese Rural Development: The Great Transformation (Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, 1985), pp. 117-140. [PDF file (99 KB)]
  • “The Decollectivization of the Chinese Countryside: A Survey of Twenty-eight Villages”, Pacific Affairs, Vol. 58, No. 4 (Winter 1985), pp. 585-606. [PDF file (2.3MB)]
  • “The Class System in Rural China: A Case Study”, in James Watson (ed.), Class and Social Stratification in Post-Revolution China (Cambridge University Press, 1984), pp. 121-141. [PDF file (105KB)]
  • “Severing the Links Between School Performance and Careers: The Sobering Experience of Chinese Urban Schools, 1968-1976”, Comparative Education (London), Vol. 20, No. 1 (1984), pp. 93-103; also in John Oxenham (ed.), Education versus Qualifications: Relationships Between Education, Selection for Employment and the Productivity of Labour (London: Allen & Unwin, 1984), pp. 176-191. [PDF file (63KB)]
  • “Grey and Black: The Hidden Economy of Rural China”, Pacific Affairs, Vol. 55, No. 3 (Fall, 1982), pp. 452-71.[PDF file (2MB)]
  • Anita Chan, Stanley Rosen and Jonathan Unger, “Students and Class Warfare: The Social Roots of the Red Guard Conflict in Canton”, The China Quarterly, No. 83 (Autumn, 1980), pp. 397-446. [PDF file (5.7 MB)]
  • Bending the School Ladder: The Failure of Chinese Educational Reform in the 1960s”, Comparative Education Review, Vol. 24, No. 2 (June 1980), pp. 221-237.
  • “The Chinese Controversy Over Higher Education”, Pacific Affairs, Vol. 53, No. 1. (Spring, 1980), pp. 29-47. [PDF file (1.8MB)]
  • “China’s Troubled Down-to-the-Countryside Campaign”, Contemporary China, Vol. 3, No. 2 (Summer 1979), pp. 79-92. [PDF file (77 KB)]
  • “Collective Incentives in the Chinese Countryside”, World Development (Oxford), Vol. VI, No. 5 (May 1978), pp. 583-601.
  • “Village Studies in China Past and Present”, in Claire Lambert (ed.), Village Studies, Vol. 2 (London: Mansell Publishers, 1978), pp. 281-287.
  • “Primary School Teaching Methods in the Wake of the Cultural Revolution”, Chinese Education, Vol. X, No. 2 (Summer 1977), pp. 4-34.
  • “Incentives in a Chinese Peasant Community”, Social Scientist Vol. V, No. 10 (May 1977), pp. 17-57.
  • “The Making and Breaking of the Chinese Secret Societies” (a review article), Journal of Contemporary Asia, Vol. V, No. 1 (Winter 1975), pp. 89-98.
  • “Foreign Minorities in Japan”, Journal of Contemporary , Vol. III, No. 3 (Autumn 1973), pp. 306-312.
  • “Japan: The Economic Threat”, Survival (The International Institute for Strategic Studies), Vol. XIV, No. 1 (January 1972), pp. 38-42.
  • “China’s Foreign Policy”, in China__! Inside the People’s Republic (New York: Bantam Books, 1972), pp. 293-329.
  • ‘Learn from Tachai’: China’s Agricultural Model”, Current Scene, Vol. IX, No. 9 (September 1971), pp. 1-11. Republished in German in Digest des Ostens, No. 11 (November 1971).
  • “Mao’s Indochina Tactics”, in Jonathan Grant, Laurence Moss and Jonathan Unger (eds), Cambodia: The Widening War in Indochina (New York: Simon & Schuster, 1971), pp. 139-150.

Translations

  • Co-editor/co-translator of Wang Xizhe, “Mao Zedong and the Cultural Revolution”, Chinese Law & Government, Vol. XVIII, No. 2 (Summer 1985), 106 pages.
  • “De-Collectivization in a Guangdong Village: An Interview”, in John Burns and Stanley Rosen (eds), Policy Conflicts in Post-Mao China: A Survey with Analysis (Armonk, N.Y.: M.E. Sharpe, Inc., 1985), pp. 274-79.
  • “Post-Cultural Revolution Primary School Education: Selected Texts”, Chinese Education, Vol. X, No. 2 (Summer 1977), pp. 35-102.
  • Co-editor/co-translator, “The Case of Li I-che”, Chinese Law & Government, Vol. X, No. 3 (Fall 1977), 112 pages.

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