2013 Vietnam Update

Conflict and Consensus in Contemporary Vietnam

Dates: Thursday, 31 October, 2013 (All day) to Friday, 1 November, 2013 (All day)
Venue: Room 1.04, Coombs Extension Building (8), Fellows Road, ANU (map)

Most of the people alive today in Vietnam have known only peace and political stability as they struggle to take advantage of an extended period of socio-economic transformation. Is this period of peaceable change durable? Have the factors that underwrote decades of wars and political, social and regional divisions been overcome? This Vietnam Update is devoted to examining conflict and consensus as key dimensions of contemporary Vietnamese life. It brings together fifteen specialists from a variety of disciplines to discuss their original research findings on these themes.

Processes of globalisation and increasing social pluralism in Vietnam pose unprecedented challenges for the nation’s political system. Several papers in this conference examine the capacity of the country’s longstanding political institutions to cope with such complexity and respond to insistent demands for change. Is Vietnam’s party inevitably heading for a major crisis or is there evidence of unexpected resilience in the face of mounting problems?

Despite an official emphasis on stability and harmonious integration, conflicts and disputes are a prominent feature of Vietnam’s domestic landscape. What do these disputes tell us about the fault-lines that divide the society? Presenters will investigate the genesis of several significant contemporary conflicts and how they are articulated, managed and resolved. They explore the part played in the regulation of disputes and in mobilisation for change by sentiments, symbols, stories and memories.

Papers also investigate the processes that promote consensus from ‘micro’ to ‘macro’ societal levels. The experiences of marginalised minorities, landless farmers, globalised youth, forgotten war heroes, and urban migrants are illuminated as presenters explore how tensions and grievances are brought to light and sometimes resolved, and how the status quo is maintained.

Kerrie Hogan

Kerrie completed a Bachelor of Community Education and a Graduate Diploma in Teaching from the University of Canberra and the Australian Catholic University. Kerrie has worked at the ANU since...

Minorities at Large: New Approaches to Minority Ethnicity in Vietnam, Philip Taylor (ed.), 2011. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Labour in Vietnam, Anita Chan (ed.), 2011. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Education in Vietnam, Jonathan London (ed.), 2011. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Modernity and Re-enchantment: Religion in Post-revolutionary Vietnam, Philip Taylor (ed.), 2007. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Beyond Hanoi: Local Government in Vietnam, Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet and David G. Marr (eds), 2004. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Social Inequality in Vietnam and the Challenges to Reform, Philip Taylor (ed.), 2004. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Getting Organized in Vietnam: Moving in and around the Socialist State, Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet, Russell H.K. Heng, and David W.H. Koh (eds), 2003. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Consuming Urban Culture in Contemporary Vietnam, Lisa Drummond and Mandy Thomas (eds), 2003. London: Routledge/Curzon.

The Mass Media in Vietnam, David Marr (ed.), 1998. Monograph 25. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University, 1998.

Doi Moi: Ten Years after the 1986 Party Congress, Adam Fforde (ed.), 1997. Monograph 23. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University.

Vietnam Assessment: Creating a Sound Investment Climate, Suiwah Leung (ed.), 1996. Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Dilemmas of Development: Vietnam Update 1994, Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet (ed.), 1995. Monograph 22. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University.

Vietnam’s Rural Transformation, Doug J. Porter and Benedict J. Tria Kerkvliet (eds), 1995. Boulder: Westview Press, and Singapore: Institute of Southeast Asian Studies.

Vietnam and The Rule of Law, Carlyle Thayer and David G. Marr (eds), 1993. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University.

Doi Moi: Vietnam’s Renovation Policy and Performance, Dean K. Forbes, Terence H. Hull. David G. Marr and Brian Brogan (eds), 1991. Monograph 14. Canberra: Department of Political and Social Change, Australian National University.

Convenor

Dr Philip Taylor
Department of Anthropology
ANU College of Asia & the Pacific
Australian National University
Canberra, ACT, 0200

+61 2 6125 2300
philip.taylor@anu.edu.au

Administrative support

Mrs Kerrie Hogan
School of International, Political & Strategic Studies
College of Asia and the Pacific
Hedley Bull Centre (#130)
The Australian National University
Canberra ACT 0200

+61 2 6125 2167
kerrie.hogan@anu.edu.au

Updated:  23 March 2016/Responsible Officer:  Su-Ann Tan/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team