Indonesia

Simplistic views of Indonesian Islam are limiting Australian diplomacy

Professor Greg Fealy makes some observations about Indonesian Islam and its impact on Australian diplomacy.

Indonesia 1965: the attempted coup and the rise of Suharto

Professor Robert Cribb (PSC) says, "50 years on, Indonesia still lives with the consequences of the 1965 coup".

Jakarta election tests Indonesia's limits of tolerance

Jakarta will go to the polls in an election that presents an unusually stark choice between religious solidarity and governmental performance.

Indonesian President Joko Widodo a target over governor's alleged blasphemy

Indonesian rock musician Ahmad Dhani told the crowd: "I am very sad and crying for having a president who does not respect the habibs (men who claim descent from the family of the Prophet Muhammad) and ulema (Islamic scholars). I want to say dog! I want to say pig!" A poster has been circulating on Whatsapp messaging groups spruiking a so-called "defending Islam demonstration" on November 25, calling for President Jokowi to be brought down if Ahok remains a free man.

Protests in Indonesia

Michael McLaren speaks to Associate Professor Greg Fealy from the Department of Political and Social Change at ANU about the weekend protests in Indonesia and whether hardline Islamists are threatening democracy.

Islamists March in Jakarta, Demanding Christian Governor Be Jailed

Jakarta, Indonesia — Tens of thousands of Indonesians marched in Jakarta on Friday, demanding that the city’s first Christian governor in decades be jailed for blasphemy. The rally was a show of strength by conservative Islamic groups, who were offended by his earlier remarks about the Quran and want to weaken him as he runs for re-election.

Indonesia's Joko Widodo jets in as new bond forged

As Joko Widodo and Rodrigo ­Duterte strolled in white shirtsleeves through a sea of batik at Jakarta’s famous textile market some weeks ago, the temptation to draw comparisons between the two former provincial mayors, now leaders of Asia’s two largest democracies, was irresistible. Both are political outsiders who rose to power on a wave of nationalism and populist discontent with the respective old-guard elites of Indonesia and The Philippines.

How can we fix Australia’s Indonesia anxiety?

Indonesia is the neighbour that makes Australians feel uneasy but also want to get on with.

Inducement or entry ticket? Broker networks and vote buying in Indonesia

This paper presents preliminary findings of a study of vote buying in several districts in Java during Indonesia’s 2014 legislative elections.

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Updated:  23 March 2016/Responsible Officer:  Su-Ann Tan/Page Contact:  CAP Web Team